Web Analytics
7 Big-Studio Movies Coming to Your Home | Press "Enter" to skip to content

7 Big-Studio Movies Coming to Your Home

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

“The Invisible Man” was a hit in theaters just last month. Now it hopes to be a hit in your home, much earlier than expected.

The coronavirus outbreak has prompted some studios to think creatively about their content, shelving many of their unreleased films until later dates. But what about those movies that were playing when theaters began to close? We look at a handful of them here, let you know where you can see them at home, and look back at the ways we covered them.

The Harley Quinn action movie from the DC Comics universe, starring Margot Robbie, opened last month (which now feels like a year ago).

Where to watch it: Available for digital purchase March 24 through Amazon, iTunes, Vudu and other platforms.

How we covered it: For those unfamiliar with the comic-book history of the main characters, we offered this explainer, with tidbits on the complicated back story of Huntress, the long history of Black Canary and the trained assassin skills of Cassandra Cain.

And the film’s director, Cathy Yan, narrated one of the movie’s most spirited action moments: a fight in a fun house:

How we reviewed it: A.O. Scott wrote that the film was “sincere in its commitment to nihilism, but coy about the implications of that commitment.”

This sci-fi action film stars Vin Diesel in “Memento”-meets-”Terminator” mode. It opened March 13 and barely got a weekend in movie theaters.

Where to watch it: Available for digital purchase March 24 through Amazon, iTunes, Vudu and other platforms.

How we reviewed it: In his review, Ben Kenigsberg wrote that Diesel “strikes the right balance of contemplation and meatheadedness.” He also wrote that the film “runs out of meta tricks before it is over” and that the director, David S.F. Wilson, delivers action scenes with “choppy continuity.”

The latest adaptation of Jane Austen’s novel, with eye-catching visuals, initially hit theaters Feb. 21.

Where to watch it: Available for 48-hour rental on Amazon Prime, iTunes and other online stores as well as on cable systems like Comcast.

How we covered it: The writer Sarah Lyall looked at the approach that the star, Anya Taylor-Joy, and the director, Autumn de Wilde, took to portray the character of Emma in a fresh way when so many film versions had already been made.

How we reviewed it: Manohla Dargis wrote that while she found some of the style tics a little overdone, “Austen’s story and words, it turns out, prove unsurprisingly durable and impervious to decorative tweaking.”

The powerhouse animated sequel took theaters by storm, with a $1.4 billion gross.

Where to watch it: Now streaming on Disney Plus

How we covered it: The writer Alexander Huls looked at the rarity of movie musical sequels and evaluated the best and worst. Robert Ito looked at some of the film’s fashions, from ice boots to travel cloaks. In an interview, the songwriters Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez discussed how they found musical inspiration in a Latin hymn, grief and Bryan Adams.

One of the film’s directors, Jennifer Lee, discussed her work on the franchise. And in her review, Manohla Dargis celebrated some of its empowering themes, but criticized its character design, writing, “Hearing women sing of freedom is irresistible, but Disney needs to take its old-fashioned ideal of female beauty and just, well, let it go.”

How we reviewed it: A.O. Scott got to the heart of the film’s satire: “It amounts to a protest against the hyper-politicization of everything, an attempt to reclaim popular culture as a demilitarized zone in the midst of our collective rhetorical forever war.” He called this “admirable,” but said that “by the end it also feels halfhearted, as what looked like a dystopian fantasy turns into an exercise in wishful thinking.”

This horror thriller starring Elisabeth Moss opened on Feb. 28 to strong box office and strong reviews.

Where to watch it: Available for 48-hour rental on Amazon Prime, iTunes and other online stores as well as on cable systems like Comcast.

How we covered it: The writer Robert Ito looked into Universal Pictures’ attempts to build a Dark Universe franchise with monster movies. And the director Leigh Whannell narrated a breathtaking moment from the film:

How we reviewed it: Making it a Critic’s Pick, Manohla Dargis praised the work of the film’s star, writing, “Moss’s full-bore performance — anchored by her extraordinarily supple face — gives the movie its emotional stakes.”

This drama, based on the memoir of the criminal justice lawyer Bryan Stevenson, received a muted release in December and a wider one in January.

Where to watch it: Available for digital purchase on March 24.

How we covered it: The director Destin Daniel Cretton narrated a scene involving an emotional discussion between two characters on death row:

How we reviewed it: A.O. Scott wrote that the film was “saved from being an earnest, inert courtroom drama when it spends time on death row, where it is opened up and given depth by two strong, subtle performances, from Jamie Foxx and Rob Morgan.”


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *