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6 Dance Performances to See in N.Y.C. This Weekend | Press "Enter" to skip to content

6 Dance Performances to See in N.Y.C. This Weekend

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Our guide to dance performances happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

Note: Because of the coronavirus outbreak and the state’s ban on gatherings of more than 500 people, many events have been canceled. As of press time, these were still scheduled to take place. Before heading out, visit the website of the performance space or organization for the latest updates.

STEPHANIE ACOSTA at the Chocolate Factory (March 19-21, 8 p.m.; through March 28). Acosta, an interdisciplinary artist, works in both video and performance. In each medium, she has created a work called “Good Day God Damn,” which views the chaos of the world around us through the lens of a cinematic thriller. The performance version, framed by her moving images, premieres in the coming week and features the dancers Leslie Cuyjet, Miriam Gabriel, Angie Pittman and Jessie Young, as well as the singer Alexa Grae.
718-482-7069, chocolatefactorytheater.org

FLAMENCO FESTIVAL NEW YORK at various locations (March 12-April 5). Some of the world’s best and most exciting flamenco dancers will be popping up at performance spaces throughout the city. At Baryshnikov Arts Center, Patricia Guerrero will perform “Proceso Eterno,” in which her fervent footwork “confronts the self-imposed fear of breaking social barriers” (Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2 and 7:30 p.m.). Leonor Leal will similarly push past barriers by exploring a choreographic language beyond flamenco in “No Singing Allowed” at Le Poisson Rouge (Saturday, 8 p.m.).
flamencofestival.org

KAZU KUMAGAI at the 92nd Street Y (March 13, 8 p.m.; March 14, 4 and 8 p.m.). This impressive Japanese tap artist, a Bessie award winner, brings “Good Rhythm Wonderful Life” to the Harkness Dance Festival. This evening of improvised tap and live music showcases his mesmerizing combination of nimbleness and powerful propulsion. A reference point for the work is Maya Angelou’s poem “Life Doesn’t Frighten Me,” which is read by Kumagai’s daughter. He is joined for the performance by the jazz bassist Alex Blake, the electroacoustic music composer and performance artist Akio Mokuno on keyboards, and the tap dancer Lisa La Touche.
212-415-5500, 92y.org

LYON OPERA BALLET at the Joyce Theater (March 18, 7:30 p.m.; March 19-20, 8 p.m.; through March 22). Beethoven’s tricky “Grosse Fuge” for string quartet was initially dismissed by some as too convoluted, then later embraced as a masterpiece. In celebration of the 250th anniversary of the composer’s birth, this company challenged three choreographers to each tackle a different recording of it. That project, which the company calls “Trois Grandes Fugues,” arrives in New York in the coming week, featuring interpretations by three very different, albeit equally esteemed, artists: Maguy Marin, Lucinda Childs and Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker.
212-242-0800, joyce.org

[Read about the events that our other critics have chosen for the week ahead.]

PLATFORM 2020 at Danspace Project (March 13, 6 p.m.; March 14 and 19, 8 p.m.). Okwui Okpokwasili, the current curator of this annual ideas festival, presents on Friday an encore of “Sitting on a Man’s Head,” a four-hour ritual/performance she created with Peter Born (the show is sold out, but a limited number of tickets will be available at the box office during the performance at 6:15 and 8:15 p.m.). On Saturday, Okpokwasili is joined by the singer and composer Samita Sinha, who uses Bengalese Baul music, a spiritual folk tradition, to explore her cultural heritage through voice and body; Okpokwasili contributes songs from her recently released first album. On March 19, a handful of artists each get 10 to 15 minutes to make a contribution to a Platform discussion through movement, text or sound in “Poetic Utterance #1.”
866-811-4111, danspaceproject.org

ABBY Z AND THE NEW UTILITY at New York Live Arts (March 18-21, 7:30 p.m.). The choreographer Abby Zbikowski often asks the body to do near-impossible sequences of tasks that send it whipping, whirling, leaping and rolling in quick succession. Her work “Radioactive Practice” is an intense exhibition of this approach, which pulls from disparate styles, including hip-hop and punk, which is also reflected in the score by Raphael Xavier. For this piece, Zbikowski collaborated with the Senegalese dance artist and dramaturge Momar Ndiaye and a cast of 10 unrestrained dancers.
212-691-6500, newyorklivearts.org


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